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Wednesday June 28th 2017
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Gatorade: Good For Boxing? Part I

It’s another hot day in Southern California and I’ve got “ESPN The Magazine” in my left hand and a nice cool Gatorade in my right. This past week, the temperature has been at an average of about 110 degrees. If it wasn’t for my daily dosage of orange flavored Gatorade, I don’t know how I could survive in this heat. This got me thinking about the pain boxers go through for 12 rounds; the heat, humidity, and exhaustion (aside from being continuously being hit in the body and face). As most of you know, The WBA has recently backed the Nevada State Athletic Commissions ruling to allow boxers to drink Gatorade during fights. In my opinion, it should NOT be, and in my opinion, hurts a fighter’s image.

It’s another hot day in Southern California and I’ve got “ESPN The Magazine” in my left hand and a nice cool Gatorade in my right. This past week, the temperature has been at an average of about 110 degrees. If it wasn’t for my daily dosage of orange flavored Gatorade, I don’t know how I could survive in this heat. This got me thinking about the pain boxers go through for 12 rounds; the heat, humidity, and exhaustion (aside from being continuously being hit in the body and face). As most of you know, The WBA has recently backed the Nevada State Athletic Commissions ruling to allow boxers to drink Gatorade during fights. In my opinion, it should NOT be, and in my opinion, hurts a fighter’s image.

A Farz B. Disclaimer: I want to make it clear that an athlete’s safety should always be a priority in any sport.

I’ve always looked at boxing as a real mans sport; two grown men slugging it out for 10, 11, 12 rounds, putting it all out on the line for pride and respect. These men didn’t need Gatorade in their system to get them up from the stool, touch gloves, and slug it out 3 minutes at a time. Water was the only liquid they needed to bob and weave, jab, uppercut, and 1-2 their way to championship status. These men never needed Gatorade to survive; Muhammad Ali didn’t need Gatorade to become the greatest fighter of all time, Buster Douglas didn’t need Gatorade to shock the world in Tokyo and defeat Mike Tyson (my least favorite day of all time), and Gatorade didn’t help make Oscar De La Hoya the Golden Boy.

I can fully understand why professional baseball, basketball, and hockey players need Gatorade. Each athlete performs at their highest level every night, every week, for six months, and need the energy enhancing drink to make sure their bodies don’t break down on them. At about 2 ½ to 3 hours a game, these athletes sacrifice everything for victory, even if it’s with sprained ankles, bad knees, or bruised bodies.

But boxers are different. They don’t fight every night, or every other night, for six months at a time. They fight once every three or four months, sometimes even six, or a whole year. Part of their 2-3 month training involves making weight, building strength, scouting their opponents, but most importantly, preparing themselves for 12 rounds of boxing.

Fatigue is a big part of the game. Can you maintain the ability to keep your arms up when your body is aching, your head is pounding, and your face is swelling up like a balloon? If your opponent is only drinking water, and you’re drinking Gatorade, do you consider that a fair fight? Do boxing fans consider you to have unfair edge? Part two of my story will have me asking that same questions to different boxers and boxing fans.

Stay tuned for part two of “Gatorade: Good For Boxing?”

If you’d like to share your own opinion send us an email at info@touchgloves.com or visit our Myspace, www.myspace.com/touchgloves.com, and leave us a comment.

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